Friday, Oct 31, 2014

Setting Birds Up For Breeding



Choosing the Right Birds for Breeding

Where to Buy / Obtain Birds From

Disease Testing & Sexing

Housing Birds - Cages/Aviaries, Perches, Watering Systems, Lighting, Heating Systems / Heating Options for Sick Birds or Babies, Air Quality / Air Conditioning, Bird-safe Plants that Clean / Remove Toxins from Your Air

Aviary Management - Breeding Loan Agreements, Record Keeping, Bird Identification, Closed Aviary Concept, Pharmaceutical Supplies




What Kind of Birds are Right For Me?

Choosing the right birds: Yesterday, I prepared the page on "Mate Aggression" -- a condition that is specific only to birds kept in capivity. The compounding factors of putting parrots into breeding programs, that are hand-raised without the benefit of having learned natural parenting behavior; compounded by the fact that after being handraised by humans were passed around from one home to another, neglected and abused, with severe emotional problems by the time they end up by a breeder. I saw photos of birds which I will never get out of my mind.

My hope is that ethical breeders will understand how difficult it is to find good homes for some high-demand parrots, such as Cockatoos and Macaws. Years ago I stopped breeding because I found it difficult to find good homes for my birds. If your heart is set on breeding, please think carefully about what birds you want to breed and educate the bird owners about their specific needs.

Mid-size birds are always easier than their large cousins -- of course, some can be pretty noisy (Conures) -- but they usually make up with beauty and character (sun conures, nandays, etc.). Amongst the least noisy conures is, of course, the greencheek, which has gained popularity as pet for many good reasons. For those who want "larger" birds -- the Grey Parrot is one of the less demanding species. Cockatoos are not for everyone; even the goffin which is known for its funny personality and the fact that it is easy maintenance compared to the larger toos.

Maybe the way to go is to breed for aviculture, rather than the pet trade. I am toying with the idea of breeding again, but I will not ever again breed for the pet trade. I love the grass parakeets, king parrots, finches and canaries. Eventually, I will build a really nice outside aviary. Many people simply like the idea of having nice outside aviaries, and birds to watch when they are in their garden.

Other factors to consider when contemplating breeding:

  • What zoning restrictions are imposed on your property? Some communities don't permit breeding activities / outside aviaries.

  • How noise tolerant are your neighbors? I lived in an urban area and concentrated on birds that were not noisy - african greys, australian parakeets, cockatiels, finches, canaries, mini-macaws, and some conures.

  • Which birds are in demand in your area? You don't want to breed birds that don't sell. I would discuss with local bird clubs or breeders and also do some research, such as checking out what kind of birds are for sale and how many birds are "given" away (because people can't sell them).

Choosing he right pet fo your family: Choosing the right birds for you ... For information on specific birds' pet qualities and care requirements, please visit: Parrot Species Information or Bird Species Information.




Testing for Disease and Sexing Birds


Species Research by Sibylle Johnson

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